Another outing for this from about four years ago

*****

If you missed Round 1, here it is http://wp.me/p2C8Zz-

You’ve all got the hang of this I hope, so with no further ado:

Wally

  1. A heavy metal fan
  2. A buffoon
  3.  A large pickled gherkin usually purchased by inebriates in a chip shop

Wellard

  1. Adjective used by Sharons to describe a good looking young man
  2. Adjective describing someone who is useful in a fight, hence also a noun, a wellard
  3. Pathetic

Have a butcher’s

  1. Examine or look at
  2. To break wind in a noisy manner
  3. Threaten with a knife

Park a tiger

  1. To vomit
  2. Pick up an extremely unattractive woman
  3. To have penetrative sex

Naws

  1. Transitive verb meaning to irritate
  2. Navel fluff
  3. Strange bruises you can’t account for

Wedge

  1. A trifle, a bagatelle
  2. A particularly slow and stupid racehorse that trips over its own shadow and comes to a dead stop
  3. Money

Brick

  1. A good chap
  2. To be fearful
  3. A dolt, a dunderhead

Tut

  1. Shoddy goods or rubbish
  2. An Egyptian
  3. Verb, to shoplift

Ap’orth (pronounced with a long a sound that rhymes with hay)

  1. A mongrel dog
  2. A small amount
  3. Scum round the watermark of a bath

Pit viper

  1. A woman of unpleasant and unpredictable demeanour
  2. A business man with sharp trading practices
  3. An evil handling modified roadcar with too much power and not enough grip,

And the answers are:

Wally

All three definitions are correct

Wellard

Definition 2, someone who is useful in a fight

Have a butcher’s

To examine or have a look at. Rhyming slang: butcher’s hook=look

Park a tiger

Definition 1, to vomit, is correct

Naws

Number 1, to irritate, annoy. ‘You really naws me, d’ja know that?’ Corruption of nause, which is a contraction of nauseate

Wedge

Number 3, money. Can also be a transitive verb, to wedge someone (up) is to give them some money when they run out and it’s their round. The lender, if flush, will describe himself as (well) wedged up

Brick

1 and 2 are correct. Definition 2 is derived from the phrase s******g bricks

Tut

Definition 1, shoddy goods or rubbish. Hence you can buy a load of (old) tut, and you can speak a load of tut

Ap’orth

A small amount, a halfpennyworth. It can have a secondary use as a personal pronoun. A northern man making a romantic gesture to his girlfriend or wife might be described by her as a soppy or daft ap’orth. Northern women are rubbish at romance and compliments

Pit viper

I fear Number 1 is correct. Don’t blame me. I just report it. I have heard it applied to Number 3, as in ‘It’s a right pit viper to drive. It steers OK, it just won’t stay steered.’

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